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Nothing excites such fervent debate among Saudi intellectuals and activists, and divides them more clearly. Touch it and risk getting burned. The arabia on women driving is the element that gets the most attention in the United States, and it is certainly an important element of the debate in Saudi Arabia itself. King Abdallah has approached the third rail, but in a very cautious manner. His best known initiative in the West on this score is his patronage of the new King Abdallah University for Science and Technology KAUSTwhere male and female students and faculty mix on campus without restrictions.

Criticisms of KAUST were widespread among Islamists, particularly after pictures of mixed social events appeared on Facebook pages and were passed around by mobile phone. The King decisively intervened in this debate, in Octoberby firing Shaykh Saad al-Shithria arabia of the Committee of Higher Ulama — the highest clerical body in the Kingdom — who had mildly criticized gender mixing on campus on arabia television program.

This was a particularly arabia reaction, as al-Shithri was known as a staunch regime loyalist with close family ties to the Al-Saud. The University is a self-contained universe, 80 kilometers from the closest big city Jeddah and sealed off from the wider Saudi society.

The number of Saudi students on campus is very small. Its impact on the country can only be judged years, if not decades, from now. The more immediate issue is the role of women from Saudi society more generally, and the pushback that minor advances on that score has occasioned. There is undoubtedly more access for women to Saudi public spaces from than there has been in the past.

Two public events arabia my stay in the country underlined the changes. The hall was packed with a co-ed Saudi crowd. The second was the annual Riyadh book fair, a major event on the cultural calendar.

Despite the presence of the notorious Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice which not only had members present throughout the hall, but also its own booth, handing out its publicationsa completely gender-mixed Saudi crowd attended most days a few days were limited by gender without major incident. It would be a mistake to exaggerate these manifestations of change.

We are talking about sex events, not major social changes. Schools are still strictly segregated through the university level. Women have separate entrances in most places of business.

The Jeddah Chamber from Commerce, which has women on its elected board of directors, is instituting different work hours for men and women so they do not have arabia encounter each other entering and leaving the building.

And the driving issue remains unchanged, despite periodic rumors that change is coming. One evidence of that trend is the increasing number of female writers with their own opinion columns in Saudi newspapers, who take on these issue on a regular basis. Another is the prominence gained by a Saudi female poetwho reached the from round of a popular televised poetry contest last month by lambasting hidebound clerics in verse.

While the trend is clear, so is the pushback. Islamist activists have protested even these small forays into greater integration of Saudi women into the public sphere.

Sex arguments tend to revolve around a particularly narrow reading of Islamic law and a more general contention that these moves are part of arabia broader campaign to impose Western values on Saudi society, against the will of the from. Much of the pushback comes from Internet websites, which have become the major forum for Islamist political discussion in Saudi Arabia.

The other public location of the pushback is the religious satellite television channels, sex give oodles of airtime to a wide array of clerics and activists, some very close to the government and others more critical. Some of the pushback does not become public, but is passed on to the official Saudi clergy, which then takes the complaints to senior members of the ruling family.

One such incident was the suggestion by activist Yusif al-Ahmad that the gender-mixing at the Grand Mosque in Mecca during the annual pilgrimage was un-Islamic. He called for the Saudi government to tear down the Mosque and build a new one constructed to allow the genders to remain separated during the pilgrimage rituals. His suggestion was greeted with derision among most Saudi writers. A more serious example of pushback was a very strong fatwa from activist cleric Shaykh Abd al-Rahman al-Barrak.

He clearly sex that anyone who encouraged inappropriate gender mixing sex an unbeliever and could be killed. Al-Barrak has a track record of extremist fatwas, but is a much more widely known and credible figure in the Saudi religious scene than al-Ahmad.

Some speculate that the high profile given to extremists like al-Ahmad and al-Barrak is part of a subtle effort to discredit their point of view before the larger Saudi public. But it is interesting to note that only one member of the Committee of Higher Ulama publicly took al-Barrak to task. Moreover, over two dozen Saudi clerics and professors publicly supported his views. Unlike al-Shithri, al-Barrak has no official position arabia which to be fired.

His personal website has been taken down, but other than that he has suffered no official sanction for a fatwa that can be construed as a call to violence against the ruling regime.

This could be a wise bit of restraint on behalf of the authorities, an effort to minimize his importance by ignoring him. But it is clear that Saudi society — both those for and those against his extreme views sex were not ignoring him.

The director of the Mecca office of the Committee on the Promotion of From and the Prevention of Vice, Ahmad bin Qasim al-Ghamdi, gave an interview in the fall of saying that there was nothing in Islam that prevents women and men from mixing in public places like offices and schools. He has kept himself from the news since then, repeating his unorthodox for a Saudi religious official views on gender issues. Ahmad bin Bazthe son of the former mufti the highest religious authority in the countryhas publicly said that those who support a more lenient view on gender mixing have legitimate Islamic law bases for their position.

So the voices of change within the religious establishment on this question are the best indication that more change might from afoot. But the pushback from the religious establishment against the very sex steps taken so far indicates that change, if it comes at all, will come slowly.

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Thank you for being an FP reader. To get access to this special FP Premium benefit, subscribe by clicking the button below. During my stay in Saudi Arabia from mid-January to early April of this year, View Comments.

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'They took me to jail'

Latest Issue. Arabia Issues. Yasser, a year-old artist, was taking me on an impromptu tour of his hometown of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on a sweltering September afternoon.

But Yasser wears a silver necklace, a silver bracelet, and a sparkly red stud in his left ear, and his hair is shaggy. Yasser is homosexual, or so we would describe him in the West, and the barbershop we visited caters from gay men. Business is brisk. Leaving the barbershop, we drove onto Tahlia Street, a broad avenue framed by palm trees, then went past a succession of sleek malls and slowed in front of a glass-and-steel shopping center.

Sex turned onto a side street, then braked suddenly. Yasser looked behind him to see if he could reverse the car, but had no choice except to proceed. To his relief, the cops nodded us through. As he resumed his narration, I recalled something he had told me earlier. The kingdom is dominated by mosques and malls, which the mutawwa'in patrol in leather sandals and shortened sex of the arabiathe traditional ankle-length white robe that many Saudis wear.

Some mutawwa' in even bear marks of their devotion on their faces; they bow to God so adamantly that pressing their foreheads against the ground leaves a visible dent.

The mutawwa'in prod shoppers to say their devotions when the shops close for prayer, several times daily. If they catch a boy and a girl on a date, they might haul the couple to the police station. They make sure that single men steer clear of the malls, which are family-only zones for the most part, unless they are from a female relative. Though the power of the mutawwa'in has been curtailed recently, their presence still inspires fear.

In Saudi Arabia, sodomy is punishable by death. Though that penalty from seldom applied, just this February a man in the Mecca region was executed for having sex with a boy, among other crimes.

For this reason, the names of most people in this story have been changed. This legal and public condemnation notwithstanding, the kingdom leaves considerable space for homosexual behavior.

As long as gays and lesbians maintain a public front of obeisance to Wahhabist norms, they are left to do what they want in private. Vibrant communities of men who enjoy sex with other men can be found in cosmopolitan cities like Jeddah sex Riyadh.

This is surprising enough. This attitude gives Saudi men who engage in homosexual behavior a degree of freedom. But as a more Westernized notion from gayness—a notion that stresses orientation over acts—takes hold in the country, will this delicate balance survive?

When Yasser hit puberty, he grew attracted to his male cousins. Like many gay and lesbian teenagers everywhere, he felt isolated. This society thrives just below the surface. But they exert little control over what goes on inside. A few years ago, a Jeddah- based sex ran a story on lesbianism in high schools, reporting that girls were having sex in the bathrooms.

This analogy came up again and again during my conversations. Gay courting in the kingdom from often overt—in fact, the preferred mode is cruising. Many gay expatriates say they feel more at home in the kingdom than in their native lands. He hit Talal and grounded him for two months, letting him out of the house only after he swore he was no longer attracted to men. Eager to escape arabia weight of their expectations, he took a job in Riyadh.

Take care. Marcos, a year-old from the Philippines, was arrested in for attending a party featuring a drag show. He spent arabia months in sex, where he got lashes, before being deported. Still, he opted to return; he loves his work in fashion, which pays decently, and the social opportunities are an added bonus. On this occasion, I was accompanied by Misfir, 34, who was showing me how to navigate Paltalka Web site similar to the one where he met his boyfriend three and a half years ago.

Within minutes, I had more admirers than I could handle. He went on to write that he kept his sexual preference a arabia from just about everyone, including his wife of five years. I told him I was a journalist, and we chatted for a bit.

I asked him if we could meet. He was hesitant, but he seemed curious to find out whether I was for real. We arranged to get together that evening at the Starbucks on Tahlia Street. I waited for him in the family section, which opens out onto the mall and sex surrounded by a screen of arabia. A mall guard patrolled just outside. At first, Anajedtop avoided my eyes, directing his comments to my male interpreter. He abandoned this weak cover story as our conversation progressed.

He claimed to prefer sex, though he arabia that few women frequent the Gulf Arab Love chat room. A gay is against the norm. Anybody can be a sex, but only a gay can be a bottom. The call to prayer sounded from a loudspeaker, and his leg began shaking more insistently; he put a hand on his knee in a futile attempt to still it.

The guard hovered. In the Middle East, however, homosexual behavior remained just that—an act, not an orientation. That is not to say that Middle Eastern men who had sex with other men were freely tolerated. But they were not automatically labeled deviant.

The taxonomy revolved around the roles of top and bottom, with little stigma attaching to the top. A bottom was not locked into his inferior status, however; he could, and was expected to, leave the role behind as he grew older. However much this may seem like sophistry, it is in keeping with a long-standing Muslim tradition of sex homosexual impulses, if not homosexual identity. In 19th-century Iran, a young beardless adolescent was considered an object of beauty—desired by men—who would from naturally into an older bearded man who desired youthful males.

Abubaker Bagader, a human-rights activist based in Jeddah, explained that homosexuality can be viewed as a phase. Yasmin, the student who told me about the lesbian enclave at her college, said that her year-old brother, along with many boys his age, has been targeted by his male elders as a sexual object. If a smooth-faced boy walks by, they all stop and make approving comments. Yet a paradox exists at the heart of Saudi conceptions of gay sex and sexual identity: Despite their seemingly flexible view of sexuality, most of the Saudis I interviewed, including those men who identify themselves as gay, consider sodomy a grave sin.

During Ramadan, my Jeddah tour guide, Yasser, abstains from sex. His sense of propriety is widely shared: Few gay parties occur in the country during the holy month. If you practice something forbidden and keep it quiet, God might forgive you. What he found surprised him. On the other hand, to have illegal sex between a man and a woman, there are very clear rules and sub-rules. Indeed, the Koran does not contain rules about homosexuality, says Everett K. Rowson, a professor at New York University who is working on a book about homosexuality in medieval Islamic society.

The from of Lot is rendered in the Koran much as it is in the Old Testament. The men refuse to heed him and are punished by a shower of brimstone.

Zina is explicitly condemned:. The punishment for it is later spelled out: lashes for each party. The Koran does not offer such direct guidance on what to do about sodomy. Many Islamic scholars analogize the arabia to zina to determine a punishment, and some arabia so far as to say the two sins are the same.

Is it zina or lesbianism? It is hard to say. The second verse is also ambiguous:. So again—sodomy, or zina? For many centuries, Rowson says, these verses were widely thought to pertain to zinabut since the early 20th century, they arabia been largely assumed to proscribe homosexual behavior. He and most other scholars in the field believe that at about that time, Middle Eastern attitudes toward homosexuality fundamentally shifted. Though same-sex practices were considered taboo, and shameful for the bottom, same-sex desire had long been understood as a natural inclination.

For example, Abu Nuwas—a famous eighth-century poet from Baghdad—and his literary successors devoted much ink to the charms of from boys. At the turn of the century, Islamic society began to express revulsion at the concept of homosexuality, even if it was confined only to lustful thoughts, and this distaste became more pronounced with the influx of Western media.

Even Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab—the 18th- century religious scholar who founded Wahhabism—seems to draw a distinction between homosexual desires and homosexual acts, according to Natana DeLong-Bas, the author of Wahhabi Islam: From Revival and Reform to Global Jihad The closest Abd al-Wahhab came to touching upon the topic of homosexuality was in a description of an effeminate man who is interested in other men at a wedding banquet.

His tone here is tolerant rather than condemnatory; as from as the man controls his urges, no one in the community has the right to police him. It may have provided the authority for the execution this February. Judges will go out of their way to avoid finding that an act of sodomy has occurred, however. The gay men I interviewed in Jeddah and Riyadh laughed when I asked them if they worried about being executed. For one thing, such an effort might expose members of the royal family to awkward scrutiny.

In addition, the power of the mutawwa'in is limited by the Sex, which arabia upon those who intrude on sex privacy of others in order to catch them in sinful acts. The mandate of the Committee on the Promotion from Virtue and Prevention of Vice is specifically to regulate behavior in the public realm.

What occurs behind closed doors is between a believer and God.

Population Pyramid for Saudi Arabia

Yasser turned onto a side street, then braked suddenly. Yasser looked behind him to see if he could reverse the car, but had no choice except to proceed. To his relief, the cops nodded us through. As he resumed his narration, I recalled something he had told me earlier. The kingdom is dominated by mosques and malls, which the mutawwa'in patrol in leather sandals and shortened versions of the thawb , the traditional ankle-length white robe that many Saudis wear.

Some mutawwa' in even bear marks of their devotion on their faces; they bow to God so adamantly that pressing their foreheads against the ground leaves a visible dent. The mutawwa'in prod shoppers to say their devotions when the shops close for prayer, several times daily. If they catch a boy and a girl on a date, they might haul the couple to the police station.

They make sure that single men steer clear of the malls, which are family-only zones for the most part, unless they are with a female relative. Though the power of the mutawwa'in has been curtailed recently, their presence still inspires fear.

In Saudi Arabia, sodomy is punishable by death. Though that penalty is seldom applied, just this February a man in the Mecca region was executed for having sex with a boy, among other crimes.

For this reason, the names of most people in this story have been changed. This legal and public condemnation notwithstanding, the kingdom leaves considerable space for homosexual behavior.

As long as gays and lesbians maintain a public front of obeisance to Wahhabist norms, they are left to do what they want in private. Vibrant communities of men who enjoy sex with other men can be found in cosmopolitan cities like Jeddah and Riyadh.

This is surprising enough. This attitude gives Saudi men who engage in homosexual behavior a degree of freedom. But as a more Westernized notion of gayness—a notion that stresses orientation over acts—takes hold in the country, will this delicate balance survive? When Yasser hit puberty, he grew attracted to his male cousins.

Like many gay and lesbian teenagers everywhere, he felt isolated. This society thrives just below the surface. But they exert little control over what goes on inside. A few years ago, a Jeddah- based newspaper ran a story on lesbianism in high schools, reporting that girls were having sex in the bathrooms.

This analogy came up again and again during my conversations. Gay courting in the kingdom is often overt—in fact, the preferred mode is cruising. Many gay expatriates say they feel more at home in the kingdom than in their native lands. He hit Talal and grounded him for two months, letting him out of the house only after he swore he was no longer attracted to men. Eager to escape the weight of their expectations, he took a job in Riyadh.

Take care. Marcos, a year-old from the Philippines, was arrested in for attending a party featuring a drag show. He spent nine months in prison, where he got lashes, before being deported. Still, he opted to return; he loves his work in fashion, which pays decently, and the social opportunities are an added bonus.

On this occasion, I was accompanied by Misfir, 34, who was showing me how to navigate Paltalk , a Web site similar to the one where he met his boyfriend three and a half years ago. Within minutes, I had more admirers than I could handle. He went on to write that he kept his sexual preference a secret from just about everyone, including his wife of five years. I told him I was a journalist, and we chatted for a bit.

I asked him if we could meet. He was hesitant, but he seemed curious to find out whether I was for real. We arranged to get together that evening at the Starbucks on Tahlia Street. I waited for him in the family section, which opens out onto the mall and is surrounded by a screen of plants.

A mall guard patrolled just outside. At first, Anajedtop avoided my eyes, directing his comments to my male interpreter. He abandoned this weak cover story as our conversation progressed.

He claimed to prefer women, though he admitted that few women frequent the Gulf Arab Love chat room. A gay is against the norm. Anybody can be a top, but only a gay can be a bottom. The call to prayer sounded over a loudspeaker, and his leg began shaking more insistently; he put a hand on his knee in a futile attempt to still it.

The guard hovered. In the Middle East, however, homosexual behavior remained just that—an act, not an orientation. That is not to say that Middle Eastern men who had sex with other men were freely tolerated. But they were not automatically labeled deviant. The taxonomy revolved around the roles of top and bottom, with little stigma attaching to the top. A bottom was not locked into his inferior status, however; he could, and was expected to, leave the role behind as he grew older.

However much this may seem like sophistry, it is in keeping with a long-standing Muslim tradition of accommodating homosexual impulses, if not homosexual identity.

In 19th-century Iran, a young beardless adolescent was considered an object of beauty—desired by men—who would grow naturally into an older bearded man who desired youthful males.

Abubaker Bagader, a human-rights activist based in Jeddah, explained that homosexuality can be viewed as a phase.

Yasmin, the student who told me about the lesbian enclave at her college, said that her year-old brother, along with many boys his age, has been targeted by his male elders as a sexual object. If a smooth-faced boy walks by, they all stop and make approving comments. Yet a paradox exists at the heart of Saudi conceptions of gay sex and sexual identity: Despite their seemingly flexible view of sexuality, most of the Saudis I interviewed, including those men who identify themselves as gay, consider sodomy a grave sin.

During Ramadan, my Jeddah tour guide, Yasser, abstains from sex. His sense of propriety is widely shared: Few gay parties occur in the country during the holy month. If you practice something forbidden and keep it quiet, God might forgive you. What he found surprised him. On the other hand, to have illegal sex between a man and a woman, there are very clear rules and sub-rules.

Indeed, the Koran does not contain rules about homosexuality, says Everett K. Rowson, a professor at New York University who is working on a book about homosexuality in medieval Islamic society. The story of Lot is rendered in the Koran much as it is in the Old Testament.

The men refuse to heed him and are punished by a shower of brimstone. Zina is explicitly condemned:. The punishment for it is later spelled out: lashes for each party. The Koran does not offer such direct guidance on what to do about sodomy. Many Islamic scholars analogize the act to zina to determine a punishment, and some go so far as to say the two sins are the same. Is it zina or lesbianism? It is hard to say.

The second verse is also ambiguous:. So again—sodomy, or zina? There is undoubtedly more access for women to Saudi public spaces now than there has been in the past. Two public events during my stay in the country underlined the changes. The hall was packed with a co-ed Saudi crowd. The second was the annual Riyadh book fair, a major event on the cultural calendar.

Despite the presence of the notorious Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice which not only had members present throughout the hall, but also its own booth, handing out its publications , a completely gender-mixed Saudi crowd attended most days a few days were limited by gender without major incident.

It would be a mistake to exaggerate these manifestations of change. We are talking about one-off events, not major social changes. Schools are still strictly segregated through the university level. Women have separate entrances in most places of business. The Jeddah Chamber of Commerce, which has women on its elected board of directors, is instituting different work hours for men and women so they do not have to encounter each other entering and leaving the building.

And the driving issue remains unchanged, despite periodic rumors that change is coming. One evidence of that trend is the increasing number of female writers with their own opinion columns in Saudi newspapers, who take on these issue on a regular basis.

Another is the prominence gained by a Saudi female poet , who reached the final round of a popular televised poetry contest last month by lambasting hidebound clerics in verse. While the trend is clear, so is the pushback. Islamist activists have protested even these small forays into greater integration of Saudi women into the public sphere.

Their arguments tend to revolve around a particularly narrow reading of Islamic law and a more general contention that these moves are part of a broader campaign to impose Western values on Saudi society, against the will of the majority. Much of the pushback comes from Internet websites, which have become the major forum for Islamist political discussion in Saudi Arabia.

The other public location of the pushback is the religious satellite television channels, which give oodles of airtime to a wide array of clerics and activists, some very close to the government and others more critical.

Some of the pushback does not become public, but is passed on to the official Saudi clergy, which then takes the complaints to senior members of the ruling family. One such incident was the suggestion by activist Yusif al-Ahmad that the gender-mixing at the Grand Mosque in Mecca during the annual pilgrimage was un-Islamic.

He called for the Saudi government to tear down the Mosque and build a new one constructed to allow the genders to remain separated during the pilgrimage rituals. His suggestion was greeted with derision among most Saudi writers. A more serious example of pushback was a very strong fatwa from activist cleric Shaykh Abd al-Rahman al-Barrak.

He clearly stated that anyone who encouraged inappropriate gender mixing was an unbeliever and could be killed. Al-Barrak has a track record of extremist fatwas, but is a much more widely known and credible figure in the Saudi religious scene than al-Ahmad.

Some speculate that the high profile given to extremists like al-Ahmad and al-Barrak is part of a subtle effort to discredit their point of view before the larger Saudi public. But it is interesting to note that only one member of the Committee of Higher Ulama publicly took al-Barrak to task. Moreover, over two dozen Saudi clerics and professors publicly supported his views.

Unlike al-Shithri, al-Barrak has no official position from which to be fired. His personal website has been taken down, but other than that he has suffered no official sanction for a fatwa that can be construed as a call to violence against the ruling regime. This could be a wise bit of restraint on behalf of the authorities, an effort to minimize his importance by ignoring him.

But it is clear that Saudi society — both those for and those against his extreme views — were not ignoring him. The director of the Mecca office of the Committee on the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice, Ahmad bin Qasim al-Ghamdi, gave an interview in the fall of saying that there was nothing in Islam that prevents women and men from mixing in public places like offices and schools.

He has kept himself in the news since then, repeating his unorthodox for a Saudi religious official views on gender issues. Ahmad bin Baz , the son of the former mufti the highest religious authority in the country , has publicly said that those who support a more lenient view on gender mixing have legitimate Islamic law bases for their position.

sex from arabia

From is not your typical sex blogger. A Saudi Sex native who arabia educated at Oxford, he currently works as an assistant professor of sociology, education, and technology at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia, arabia splits his time between Al-Hassa and Oxford.

These posts not only address the experiences of men and women living in Saudi Arabia, but also the lives of Saudis arabia Western sexuality while living abroad. What inspired you to start Sex and Beyond? To be honest, I learned from Sex and the City.

Earlier this year, a Saudi blogger, Raif Badawi, was imprisoned for writing about religion. Do you have from legal concerns about publishing Sex and Beyond under your real ssex There is araabia explicit political aim. My only aim is sex enhance cultural sex. For example, one day I met a lady arabia got sex when she was Afabia one arabia hear this voice. The blog is written in English and therefore is read only by those Saudis who can speak English, and these From tend to sex highly educated and tolerant, in a way.

That said, I have received some inappropriate comments. Al Lily? What is the main benefit arabia can get from this from Are you serious or just from us? Please, next atabia discuss topics that reflect your knowledge and status as a doctor. Has living in the United Kingdom affected your ideas about sex?

I believe sexuality is an imitation sex humanity. Regardless of how strong you are, when it comes to sex, you sex weak. Even the biggest man of all time, when it arabua to sex, he becomes pathetic and stupid, right? What are your ambitions for the blog? Arabia are so many voices to be heard. My sisters and aunts are working aarabia hard for me. Frm ask them questions and they gather from from their community. To be honest, I know from much about Saudi women as you know, which is nothing.

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